Pai Gow needs two hands

The Pai Gow variant of poker is based on the Chinese match Pai Gow during the early 80's. it was developed by Fred Wolf when he was in need of a fresh attraction in his company that would easily catch the public's attention and increase the patrons at Bell Club, the establishment he owns in Bell City. Sure enough, Pai Gow did just that.

The game uses 53 cards, including the joker. The dealer gives out seven faced down cards for each player. Eventually, the players will need to form two hands from the seven cards, one with 5 cards and the other with two, maintaining that the hand with the two cards should have a lower rank compare to the one with the five cards. This means that in Pai Gow, the only ranking for hands with two cards is high cards or a pair.

One player will assume the role of a banker, the position which alters each hand, pretty much similar to the dealer button at Texas Hold'Em. Pai Gow is rather straightforward. The players and the banker form their hands. When the banker's hands with two and five cards respectively are defeated by that of a player's, the player takes the cash. When only one hand wins, he will push but if both the banker's hands beat his, he loses. Every time a tie between a hand of the banker and the player happens, the banker has the leverage. This means that when the player ties with the banker on the hand with five cards and loses on the hand with two cards, he still loses.

Under usual circumstances, it is advisable to form a hand with two cards that's as strong as possible but not leaving the hand with the five cards weak. The most typical strategy is to: (1) if you are not dealt any flushes, pairs or straights, he has to pair the highest card with card that has the third highest value to form his hands with two cards and (2) when he receives just one pair, he should include it in his hand with five cards.